More Info on Net Neutrality

This is from a recent email from the ALA Washington Office:

The Washington Office is following up last week’s net neutrality blog with an early analysis of the FCC’s draft order, as well as an action alert that ALA members can use to contact Congress. As we write in the blog, we believe FCC Chairman Pai likely has the three votes needed among FCC commissioners to pass the order. Contacting Members of Congress to pressure the Chairman is the most reasonable grassroots strategy as we prepare for the almost certain legal challenges to come.

Please share the blog post and action alert with your colleagues. We will continue our analysis and planning for how to best inform and engage ALA members as this issue continues to play out. The FCC vote is scheduled for December 14, so we are considering options for activities leading up to and during that day. Be assured we are watching this issue closely.

In case it comes up in any of your units, roundtables, or divisions— ALA has two net neutrality resolutions from 2006 and 2014. The first is a resolution affirming network neutrality and the second is a resolution reaffirming support.

  • Resolution endorsed by ALA Council on June 28, 2006. Council Document 20.12 (CD#20.12):

https://alair.ala.org/bitstream/handle/11213/987/06-28-06-CD20.12.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

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Net Neutrality and ALA

The ALA Washington Office has released a resource for librarians concerned about recent actions on net neutrality. You can still take action to protest the move to roll back net neutrality, but there are some deadlines coming up in December. If you are concerned about this issue, take action soon.

If you are new to the idea of net neutrality, the most accessible overview is  John Oliver’s slightly NSFW video from Last Week Tonight. It is also decidedly NSFI (not safe for instruction). I’ll find additional resources and post here. Please let me know if you have other resources that are particularly good.

Finally, I am the incoming ALA Councilor for North Carolina. Our orientation isn’t until February, but they have put us on the lists for Council. So, I will post information here and on social media if it seems critical. Let me know if you have questions or concerns so that I can better represent NC at Council!

Slides and video from Tips for Student Success with Data @SAGElibrarynews

I gave a presentation with Diana Aleman from SAGE Stats about helping students discover data. The principles are pretty straightforward, but hopefully you will find some of them helpful.

My slides are available for reuse/remix on figshare.

The recording is also available including Diana’s part (she’s awesome!).

IFLA, Wrocław, and #WLIC2017

I’m having a great conference at IFLA. I’ve met people from all over the world, including Croatia, Australia, Malaysia, Taiwan, South Africa, Nigeria, Germany, Norway, the UK, as well as our large US contingent. I’ve really enjoyed learning about the variety of projects people are working on from library support for refugees to reading habits of Iranian students to a new VR initiative at the Bergen public library. You can see the variety of topics from a selection of posters.

Today I had my first meeting with the Standing Committee for the Social Science Libraries section. The structure of IFLA is a bit convoluted, but I am slowly learning. Basically, my Standing Committee does great projects like tomorrow’s workshop on using ethnography in the library and more. Looking forward to sharing their work when I am officially a member of the committee after this conference.

Spencer Acadia and I also represented IASSIST at our poster session. We were able to talk to a few people and our poster will stay up all through the conference. We are still looking to build up our membership in South America and Africa!

Finally, I’ve been trying to get to know Wrocław again. The city has changed quite a bit and is much more vibrant now. It has developed a student-oriented character that wasn’t quite here in 1995.

Several times in my walks around town a place suddenly seemed familiar and I could see it again through my memories. The picture below is of a lovely square and roundabout called Plac Kościuszki near my hotel and the train station. I walked by it a few times before I remembered this evening that it was the place I used to go for coffee almost once a week. I think a post office was also on the corner. But it seems to be gone now.

Tonight I was also able to do a food tour of the city. When I was here last, I was a student and I couldn’t afford to eat out much. We cooked a lot of pierogi that semester. On the tour, one of the restaurants had a room decorated like a Polish living room during the Communist period. In one corner was a shrine to Solidarność, the trade union and opposition group, and its members from Wrocław.

So, just a few of the things going on. Tomorrow I have an all day workshop and will post notes as possible. It has been a blast sharing and learning with everyone at IFLA. Although I am new to the organization and only know a few people, everybody has been friendly and welcoming.

And I will close out with a picture of the translation booth and the IFLA President on the stage. I’ve never seen a translation booth in action, so quite a fun moment for me!

Help! webinar for August

Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents … State Agency Databases Project, finding and sharing agency databases by subject map-1149538_960_720

The Government Resources Section of the North Carolina Library Association welcomes you to a series of webinars designed to help us increase our familiarity with government information. All are welcome because government information wants to be free.

Join Daniel Cornwall for a short exploration of the State Agency Databases Project of ALA GODORT. Daniel will show the types of resources through the project and the new auto-updating subject compilations the LibGuides platform has enabled. He will conclude with how to contribute new databases to the project and how to share content from the project on your own LibGuides and web pages.

Daniel Cornwall is the Internet and Technology Consultant for the Alaska State Library. He has over a decade of experience in federal and state government information. He has led the State Agency Databases Project for ALA GODORT since July 2017. When not doing library or government information type stuff he enjoys hiking, reading and working on citizen science projects at zooniverse.org. More professional information about Daniel can be found on his LinkedIn profile at https://www.linkedin.com/in/danielcornwall/.

We will meet together online on August 16 from 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. (Eastern). Please RSVP for the session using this link: http://tinyurl.com/grs-session73

We will use WebEx for the live session. Information on testing and accessing the session will be made available when you register.

The session will be recorded and available after the live session, linked from the NCLA GRS web page (http://www.nclaonline.org/government-resources).