Slides and video from Tips for Student Success with Data @SAGElibrarynews

I gave a presentation with Diana Aleman from SAGE Stats about helping students discover data. The principles are pretty straightforward, but hopefully you will find some of them helpful.

My slides are available for reuse/remix on figshare.

The recording is also available including Diana’s part (she’s awesome!).

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IFLA, Wrocław, and #WLIC2017

I’m having a great conference at IFLA. I’ve met people from all over the world, including Croatia, Australia, Malaysia, Taiwan, South Africa, Nigeria, Germany, Norway, the UK, as well as our large US contingent. I’ve really enjoyed learning about the variety of projects people are working on from library support for refugees to reading habits of Iranian students to a new VR initiative at the Bergen public library. You can see the variety of topics from a selection of posters.

Today I had my first meeting with the Standing Committee for the Social Science Libraries section. The structure of IFLA is a bit convoluted, but I am slowly learning. Basically, my Standing Committee does great projects like tomorrow’s workshop on using ethnography in the library and more. Looking forward to sharing their work when I am officially a member of the committee after this conference.

Spencer Acadia and I also represented IASSIST at our poster session. We were able to talk to a few people and our poster will stay up all through the conference. We are still looking to build up our membership in South America and Africa!

Finally, I’ve been trying to get to know Wrocław again. The city has changed quite a bit and is much more vibrant now. It has developed a student-oriented character that wasn’t quite here in 1995.

Several times in my walks around town a place suddenly seemed familiar and I could see it again through my memories. The picture below is of a lovely square and roundabout called Plac Kościuszki near my hotel and the train station. I walked by it a few times before I remembered this evening that it was the place I used to go for coffee almost once a week. I think a post office was also on the corner. But it seems to be gone now.

Tonight I was also able to do a food tour of the city. When I was here last, I was a student and I couldn’t afford to eat out much. We cooked a lot of pierogi that semester. On the tour, one of the restaurants had a room decorated like a Polish living room during the Communist period. In one corner was a shrine to Solidarność, the trade union and opposition group, and its members from Wrocław.

So, just a few of the things going on. Tomorrow I have an all day workshop and will post notes as possible. It has been a blast sharing and learning with everyone at IFLA. Although I am new to the organization and only know a few people, everybody has been friendly and welcoming.

And I will close out with a picture of the translation booth and the IFLA President on the stage. I’ve never seen a translation booth in action, so quite a fun moment for me!

Help! webinar for August

Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents … State Agency Databases Project, finding and sharing agency databases by subject map-1149538_960_720

The Government Resources Section of the North Carolina Library Association welcomes you to a series of webinars designed to help us increase our familiarity with government information. All are welcome because government information wants to be free.

Join Daniel Cornwall for a short exploration of the State Agency Databases Project of ALA GODORT. Daniel will show the types of resources through the project and the new auto-updating subject compilations the LibGuides platform has enabled. He will conclude with how to contribute new databases to the project and how to share content from the project on your own LibGuides and web pages.

Daniel Cornwall is the Internet and Technology Consultant for the Alaska State Library. He has over a decade of experience in federal and state government information. He has led the State Agency Databases Project for ALA GODORT since July 2017. When not doing library or government information type stuff he enjoys hiking, reading and working on citizen science projects at zooniverse.org. More professional information about Daniel can be found on his LinkedIn profile at https://www.linkedin.com/in/danielcornwall/.

We will meet together online on August 16 from 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. (Eastern). Please RSVP for the session using this link: http://tinyurl.com/grs-session73

We will use WebEx for the live session. Information on testing and accessing the session will be made available when you register.

The session will be recorded and available after the live session, linked from the NCLA GRS web page (http://www.nclaonline.org/government-resources).

Learn about EPA info resources with Help!

Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents … Preserving the Environment: Information Resources of the EPA

The Government Resources Section of the North Carolina Library Association welcomes you to a series of webinars designed to help us increase our familiarity with government information. All are welcome because government information wants to be free.

epa-logoThe EPA’s National Library Network consists of 25 libraries and repositories located in the Agency’s offices, research centers, and specialized laboratories. The Library Network serves the needs of EPA staff and the public by using the latest information technologies and innovative services to acquire, organize, and deliver timely access to information. Areas of focus include basic and applied sciences, management, legal information, and other special topics. This presentation covers several aspects of EPA library collections, including the EPA National Library Catalog, the National Service Center for Environmental Publications, epa.gov, and some information about the EPA publication process.

Anthony Holderied is the Assistant Director of the Library at the Environmental Protection Agency in Research Triangle Park, NC, operating under the contract of the School of Information and Library Science at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Anthony has 10 plus years of experience providing research assistance and instruction at a variety of libraries and academic institutions, and has also worked as an instructional technologist. He has published and presented in the fields of information literacy and educational technology and holds a Master of Library Science and Master of Arts in Educational Media.

We will meet together for Session #72, online on Thursday, June 8 from 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. (Eastern). Please RSVP for the session using this link:  http://tinyurl.com/grs-session72

We will use WebEx for the live session. Information on testing and accessing the session will be made available when you register.

The session will be recorded and available after the live session, linked from the NCLA GRS web page (http://www.nclaonline.org/government-resources).

 

Spring into Science Webinar Series

Let’s celebrate science! The NCLA Government Resources Section and the NCLA STEM-LINC section are joining together for a semester of science related webinars. We are kicking off with a webinar with our favorite former North Carolinian/geospatial librarian, Hannah!

Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents … Finding geological materials through the U.S. Geological Survey
The Government Resources Section of the North Carolina Library Association and the STEM Librarianship in North Carolina (STEM-LINC) Section of the North Carolina Library Association welcomes you to “Spring into Science”, a series of webinars this spring designed to help us increase our familiarity with scientific government information. All are welcome because government information wants to be free.
What are the tricks you can use to search for and find US geological materials? Be a geo-detective with USGS documents, maps and data. This webinar will give an overview of resources available in The National Map, USGS Science Data Catalog and USGS Publications Warehouse, including how to find geological and historical topographic maps.
Hannah Hamalainen is the Geospatial and Earth Sciences Librarian at the University of New Hampshire. She received her MLIS from the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill and is the current president of the Geoscience Information Society (GSIS). She is an advocate for data visualization, science communication, geoscience education, and developing critical thinkers using information literacy. Her research interests include using remote sensing and geospatial technologies to solve problems in the natural world.
Join us on Monday, 2/27/17. We’ll meet together from 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. (Eastern). Please RSVP for the session using this link: http://tinyurl.com/grs-session67
We will use WebEx for the live session. Information on testing and accessing the session will be made available when you register.atom-1472657_960_720.png
Please save the date for future “Spring into Science” sessions:
  • March 20: NASA data and docs
  • April 19: NOAA data and docs
  • May (TBA): EPA data and docs
The session will be recorded and available after the live session, linked from the NCLA GRS web page (http://www.nclaonline.org/government-resources).